Posts Tagged ‘Elements of the Human Body’

Rumi’s “The Guest House” in the key of Carbon

The Tones of Carbon By Commons:Robert Lavinsky – File:Diamond-and-graphite-with-scale.jpg, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=39385953 This recording is a sketch of the tones of carbon done by Xochi John on cello, Maya Bennardo and me on violin. There are two versions, one that is instrumental and another with a voice over with a poem by Rumi. Maya…

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Rumi’s ‘Where Everything is Music’ in the key of Oxygen

There is a delight in following a stream of thought, seeing where it meets the next body of thought and how they dance together. The following composition is with my daughter, Xochi John (cello), Larry Stephens (percussion) and me on violin. The field recording is simple and done as a single take. The poetry of…

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Dancing Particles in the Key of Hydrogen

Rumi in the Key of Hydrogen Hydrogen, the most abundant element, the lightest known element, the element that is in every part of our body is the framework for this composition. As I work with the tones from the elements, I find a beautiful consonance between the colors. It is quite mind bending to step…

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The Human Elements

  After what seems like an inordinate amount of time, I have finished working through the elements of the human body. The question now is what to do with this body of work? Or is it, work of the body? While traveling in Europe the summer before last visiting a dear family friend, her partner…

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Tones of Lead

This is the last element in this series that I am analyzing. Lead, Pb, (plumbum-Latin), element 82 is the second heaviest stable element. It is soft, malleable, blue-white element that tarnishes quickly in moist air to a dark grey. It may be the first metal that was ever smelted at approximately 7,000 BCE. The Wikipedia…

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Tones of Gold

Gold is the 79th element and one of the heaviest naturally occurring elements. It has been known since ancient times and artifacts from the ancient Ur (modern Iraq) civilization have been found and dated to 3,800 BCE, or 5,800 years ago. It is a shiny, soft, yellowish red, heavy malleable and ductile element. A one-gram…

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Tones of Iodine

Iodine is the 53rd element of the periodic table. It is a black, shiny, crystalline solid that melts at 237 degrees Fahrenheit, just above the boiling point of water and boils at 361 degrees Fahrenheit, a good temperature to roast beets. Interestingly, it is important in the stability of the ozone layer and there is…

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Tones of Molybdenum

Molybdenum is the 42nd element in the periodic table. It was apparently known to the ancient civilizations, though was often mistaken for lead as they have similar appearances. It does not appear as a pure element in nature or an easily identifiable mineral, hence, there is no alchemical symbol for this element. More is written…

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Tones of Arsenic

Arsenic is a metalloid meaning that it has characteristics between a metal and non-metal. It is number 33 in the periodic table. The references to arsenic go back to ancient times with numerous cultures using arsenic compounds, it is rarely found in a pure state. Our name comes from the Greek. Zosimos, the Greek Alchemist,…

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Tones of Zinc

Zinc is a metal and number 30 in the periodic table. The earliest record comes from India about 3,000 years ago. The alchemist, Paracelsus, is thought to have named the element. Alchemical names include philosopher’s wool and nix alba. In current metaphysical texts zinc is related to the planet Mercury, the heart chakra, heart, circulation,…

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Tones of Nickel

Nickel is very similar to cobalt, though there is no known role in humans. Recently, the biological role in some microorganisms and plants has been established. If those microorganisms are in the human body and there is an excess of nickel in the body, then there can be some toxic responses to these organisms. Navy…

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Tones of Cobalt

    Cobalt is found only in chemically combined forms. The distinctive color, cobalt blue, is a compound of Cobalt, Aluminum and Oxygen. Like many discoveries, the Chinese have the earliest know uses of cobalt. Examples have been found in Tutankhamen’s tomb about 1350 BC, in Persian glass and jewelry and even back to the…

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